Listeners Club

Forgot Password

Not a Member? Sign up here!

Local News

Cove Point Park Tennis Courts to Close Jan. 24 for Lighting Retrofit Upgrades

PRINCE FREDERICK, Md. – Jan. 21, 2022 – The Calvert County Department of Parks & Recreation advises citizens that the tennis courts located at Cove Point Park will be temporarily closed beginning on or around Monday, Jan. 24, for lighting retrofit upgrades. Work is expected to complete Friday, Feb. 4, weather permitting. Access to the rest of the park remains open during this time.

The Calvert County Department of Parks & Recreation strives to enhance the health, economy and well-being of the Calvert County community through sustainable practices, leisure opportunities and environmental stewardship. For more information about Parks & Recreation facilities and programs, visit online at www.CalvertCountyMd.gov/ParksandRecreation.

For updates on Parks & Recreation services, park availability, field closures and more visit Parks & Recreation at www.Facebook.com/CalvertCountyParks and follow @CalvertCountyParks on Instagram.

Find information on Calvert County Government services online at www.CalvertCountyMd.gov. Stay up to date with Calvert County Government on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CalvertCountyMd and YouTube at www.youtube.com/CalvertCountyGov.


School Resource Officers Investigating False Report of Shooting

School Resource Officers Investigating False Report of ShootingOn January 19, at 11:47 a.m., a call was placed to 9-1-1 stating there was “a shooting at a school,” but the name of the school was not provided by the caller. School Resource Officers and patrol officers were immediately contacted and were able to quickly determine that a shooting had not occurred at any of the schools. Investigation showed the call was made in the area of John Hanson Middle School and further information revealed the call was made by a student at the school. School resource officers, along with school administrators and school security staff, will continue an investigation and the case will be reviewed by the Charles County State’s Attorney’s Office. The Charles County Sheriff’s Office is committed to the safety and well-being of students and staff. Parents are urged to talk with their children about the dangers of making false reports and the consequences of doing so. The investigation is ongoing.


Wanted Individual-Karen Granville

The St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the whereabouts of Karen Anne Granville, age 32 of Mechanicsville. Granville is wanted for the charge escape for removing her GPS tracking device while on pretrial supervision. Granville’s original charges were violation of probation/robbery and theft. Granville is a white female, 5’1” and weighs 135 pounds, with blonde hair and blue eyes.

 

 

Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Karen Anne Granville is asked to contact Detective Tyler Payne at (301) 475-4200 extension 78010 or by email at Tyler.Payne@stmarysmd.com.

 

Citizens may remain anonymous and contact Crime Solvers at (301) 475-3333, or text a tip to “TIP239” plus their message to “CRIMES” (274637). Through the Crime Solvers Program tipsters are eligible for an award of up to $1,000 for information about a crime in St. Mary’s County that leads to an arrest or indictment.

 

For official news and information, follow the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office on Twitter @firstsheriff.

 

Download and Share the St. Mary's Sheriff's Office mobile app: https://apps.myocv.com/share/a48820650


Death Investigation on Raphael Drive in Pomfret

Death Investigation on Raphael Drive: On January 19 at 6 p.m., officers responded to a single-family home in the 5500 block of Raphael Drive in Pomfret after receiving a call from a neighbor who indicated he went to check on the resident, whom he had not seen since the day before, and observed the resident lying on the floor and unconscious. Fireboard/EMS arrived and forced entry through the front door of the residence. The man, 49, was pronounced deceased. Inside the house, more than 100 venomous and non-venomous snakes of different varieties were discovered in tanks situated on racks. Charles County Sheriff’s detectives are conducting an investigation into the death of the man. There were no obvious signs of foul play and the decedent was transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore for an autopsy. Charles County Animal Control is coordinating rescue efforts relating to the reptiles with assistance from reptile experts from North Carolina and Virginia. All media questions relating to the snakes may be directed to Ms. Jennifer Harris, Spokesperson for the Charles County Government, at 240-435-0169. The investigation is ongoing.


Missing Persons Sought

The St. Mary’s County Sheriff's Office is seeking the whereabouts of Anna Garcia Guillen, age 19, and Dunia Yulissa Garcia Guillen, age 17, of Mechanicsville. Both girls were last seen in December at their residence. Anna Guillen is 5’6”, weighs 140 pounds, and has black hair and brown eyes. Dunia Gillen is 5’6”, weighs 130 pounds, and has black hair and brown eyes.

 

 

The two were last known to be traveling together, possibly out of state.

 

Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Anna Garcia Guillen and Dunia Yulissa Garcia Guillen is asked to contact Detective First Class Daniel Sidorowicz at (301) 475-4200 extension 78043 or by email daniel.sidorowicz@stmarysmd.com.

 

Citizens may remain anonymous and contact Crime Solvers at (301) 475-3333, or text a tip to “TIP239” plus their message to “CRIMES” (274637). Through the Crime Solvers Program tipsters are eligible for an award of up to $1,000 for information about a crime in St. Mary’s County that leads to an arrest or indictment.

 

For official news and information, follow the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office on Twitter @firstsheriff.

 

Download and Share the St. Mary's Sheriff's Office mobile app: https://apps.myocv.com/share/a48820650


Increased Traffic Enforcement along Route 235 this Month

Jan. 20, 2022:

 

For the remainder of January 2022, motorists can expect to see increased traffic enforcement by St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office deputies along Three Notch Road/Route 235 in the California/Lexington Park area. Three Notch Road is the busiest highway in St. Mary’s County with more than 50,000 vehicles traveling on it every day.

 

Sheriff’s Office deputies will be patrolling for speeding, aggressive driving, seatbelt compliance, drivers evading traffic signals and drivers illegally using their cellphones.

 

Deputies will also be enforcing Maryland’s Move Over law, which requires drivers to slow down and change lanes to give emergency responders, tow trucks and other service vehicles adequate room to operate safely on the side of the road.

 

Traffic fines are steep for violations. Motorists are advised to pay attention to their driving and others around them this month and every month.

 

“Drivers on Route 235 and St. Mary’s County highways need to reduce their speed, put their phones down and pay attention to traffic conditions to ensure that we all get to our destinations safely,” Sheriff Tim Cameron said.

 

For official news and information, follow the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office on Twitter @firstsheriff


Calvert County Sheriff's Office

During the week of January 10, 2022 – January 16, 2022, deputies of the Calvert County Sheriff’s Office responded to 1,031 calls for service throughout the community.

 

Destruction of Property: 22-01745

On January 13, 2022, Deputy Ashely responded to the 6000 block of Locust Road in St. Leonard, MD for a report of property destruction. The complainant advised sometime between 6 p.m. on Jan. 11 and 4 p.m. on Jan. 12, unknown suspect(s) put a screw in the victim’s rear tire. The value of damaged property is $300.00.

 

Destruction of Property: 22-01928

On January 14, 2022, Deputy Aley responded to the 3700 block of Hunting Creek Road in Huntingtown, MD for the reported property destruction. Contact was made with the complainant who advised unknown suspect(s) put an explosive device in the mailbox causing damage to the interior of the box. Deputy Aley was advised by USPS that a mailbox on the same street had similar damage. The estimated value of damaged property is $100.00.

 

Destruction of Property: 22-02243

On January 16, 2022, Deputy Gough responded to the 400 block of Round Up Road in Lusby, MD for the report of property destruction. The complainant advised sometime between 2 p.m. on Jan. 15 and 8:30 a.m. on Jan. 16, unknown suspect(s) completely shattered and smashed the windshield of a truck parked in the driveway of the residence using a large rock from the homeowner’s flower bed. The value of damaged property is $500.00.

 

Theft: 22-01659

On January 12, 2022, Deputy Hudson responded to the 500 block of Stern Circle in Lusby, MD for the report of a theft. The complainant advised he ordered a package and received notification of the delivery. The complainant went to retrieve the package and the package was nowhere to be found. The value of stolen property is $249.94.

 

Theft: 22-01947

On January 14, 2022, Deputy Contic responded to report of a theft at 225 Town Square Drive in Lusby, MD. The complainant advised he parked a trailer at the mentioned address on Jan. 13 and when he returned to the address on Jan. 14, the trailer had been stolen. The value of stolen property is unknown at this time.

 

ARRESTS

On January 15, 2022, Deputy T. Bowen responded to the 12800 block of Rousby Hall Road in Lusby, MD for report of a motor vehicle crash involving two vehicles. Contact was made with one of the drivers who advised a vehicle was travelling southbound in the northbound lane, struck the victim and attempted to leave the accident scene. Deputy Bowen made contact with the driver of the striking vehicle, Daniel Wayne Grover, Sr., 39 of Lusby, MD who was observed to be stumbling and had slurred speech. It was determined Grover was operating a motor vehicle under the influence of a controlled dangerous substance. Grover was transported to the Calvert County Detention Center. A search of Grover’s person revealed a paper fold with suspected heroin. Grover was charged with CDS: Possession-Not Marijuana, Possession of Contraband in a Place of Confinement, along with other traffic related citations.

 

On January 10, 2022, Deputy Bowen responded to the 700 of N. Solomons Island Road in Prince Frederick, MD for the check welfare of an individual who had fallen and was unresponsive. Contact was made with Larry Randolph Robison, 44 of Chesapeake Beach, MD. Robison was conscious, but had a strong odor of an alcoholic beverage emitting from his breath. EMS arrived on scene for Robison to be checked out, but he refused treatment. Robison stood up and fell to the ground again due to his intoxicated state. Robison was advised to go to the hospital to get checked out, but continually refused. A search of Robison’s person revealed a small amount of marijuana and a smoking device “bowl”. Robison began acting in a disorderly manner by pushing deputies on scene, using profanities, and making threats. Robison was advised he was being placed under arrest and continued to resist. Robison was transported to the Calvert County Detention Center where he was charged with Second-Degree Assault, Disorderly Conduct and Resisting Arrest.

 

On January 14, 2022, Sgt. Naecker responded to the Calvert County Circuit Courthouse for the report of a disorderly female. Per court deputies, Dawn Marie Keen, 42 of Port Republic, MD was advised masks were required while inside the courthouse per an administrative order issued Dec. 27, 2021 by Chief Judge Joseph M. Getty of the MD Court of Appeals in light of Omicron Variant of the COVID-19 Emergency. The provision states that ALL individuals entering the Circuit Courthouse of Calvert County shall wear face masks indoors regardless of vaccination status or other related health measures. Keen refused to wear a mask and was asked to leave the building, but refused to do so. Keen was advised multiple times of the policy, but refused to leave. Keen was placed under arrest and transported to the Calvert County Detention Center where she was charged with Disorderly Conduct and Trespassing of a Government House. 


Calvert County Circuit Courthouse Extends Phase III Through March 6

Due to the continued surge in Maryland of COVID-19 cases as a result of the Omicron variant, and consistent with the guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Maryland Department of Health (MDH) and local health agencies, the Maryland Judiciary has extended Phase III emergency operations. On Jan. 14, 2022, Chief Judge Joseph M. Getty of the Court of Appeals for Maryland issued an extension through March 6, 2022, of the Interim Administrative Order of Dec. 27, 2021 Restricting Statewide Operations in Light of Omicron Variant of the COVID-19 Emergency. The interim operational plan took effect Dec. 29, 2021, and will now continue through Sunday, March 6, 2022, pending further order.  Additionally, all jury trials scheduled through March 4, 2022, shall be suspended.  The resumption of jury trials will be on March 7, 2022. 

Accordingly, Administrative Order dated Dec. 29, 2021, issued by Mark S. Chandlee, Administrative Judge for the Circuit Court for Calvert County, remains in full force and effect.   That Order requiring the Calvert County Sheriff’s Office to restrict access and screen individuals entering the Courthouse located at 175 Main St. in Prince Frederick, and is authorized to continue to conduct thermal temperature checks of all individuals entering the Courthouse; ensure proper implementation of the screening protocol and receipt of responses to screening questions propounded by entrants; inquire about the purpose of an individual’s visit to the Courthouse; limit the number of individuals entering the Courthouse at any given time to ensure the health and safety of all individuals in the Courthouse, and DENY entry to any individual whose screening results require refusal of entry to the Courthouse for the health and safety of all individuals in the Courthouse. Any individual denied entry with an affirmative response to the screening inquiry in consultation with the Administrative Judge will be provided with information regarding alternative means to address the purpose of that person’s intended visit to the court. All individuals entering the Circuit Court for Calvert County shall wear face masks indoors regardless of vaccination status or other related health measures. 

The courthouse will continue restrictions to limit the concentration of individuals and allow social distancing, consistent with state and federal guidance. The new administrative orders can be viewed on the Maryland Judiciary website at https://mdcourts.gov/coronavirusorders and the Circuit Court for Calvert County website at http://circuitcourt.co.cal.md.us.

Further, Judge Chandlee has determined that all currently scheduled matters, excluding jury trials, in the Calvert County Circuit Court will remain as scheduled. All jury trials, however, will be suspended until the Judiciary is able to reenter Phase V of its reopening plan. 

Accordingly, civil and criminal trials currently scheduled to commence between Dec. 29, 2021, and March 4, 2022, shall be converted to status conferences. All hearings will be heard in person at the Calvert County Circuit Courthouse. Any party/litigant and/or attorney appearing in a matter scheduled on or after Dec. 29, 2021 through March 4, 2022, may file an appropriate motion in writing to advise the Court of any issue that may prevent a party, attorney, and/or witness from appearing in person for their scheduled hearing or make a request to appear remotely for their scheduled hearing. The Circuit Court will rule on any requests for conversions to remote hearings and continuances on a case-by-case basis.

 

Court offices are fully staffed. Court personnel will be available to the public by telephone between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Maryland Electronic Court (MDEC) continues to be available for electronic filing and is required to be used for all MDEC counties. The courts shall be open to the public, and no appointment shall be necessary (although preferred) for access. 

Any questions or concerns relative to cases or proceedings should be directed to:

·         Circuit Court: 410-535-1600

·         District Court: 443-550-6700

Calvert County Government continues to take precautionary measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 and limit the number of people infected. Residents, employees and media are encouraged to monitor Calvert County’s virtual resource center for updates and information resources: www.CalvertCountyMd.gov/Coronavirus.

Find information on Calvert County Government services online at www.CalvertCountyMd.gov. Stay up to date with Calvert County Government on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CalvertCountyMd and YouTube at www.youtube.com/CalvertCountyGov.


Parks & Recreation to Hold Virtual Public Meeting for Land Preservation, Parks & Recreation Plan

The Calvert County Department of Parks & Recreation will hold a virtual public meeting to present the findings of its Land Preservation, Parks and Recreation Plan (LPPRP) input survey. The meeting will be held through Zoom Monday, Jan. 31, 2022, at 7 p.m. Interested citizens can visit online to access the meeting link. Registration is not required.  

The Calvert County LPPRP opened a survey to the public in December 2021 to gather feedback on the conservation and development of outdoor recreation opportunities in Calvert County over the next five years. The upcoming meeting will provide citizens a chance to review and discuss the results of the survey. More information on the project is available at www.CalvertCountyMd.gov/LPPRP.

Citizens who are unable to attend can view a recording of the meeting on the Calvert County Government website at www.CalvertCountyMd.gov/Videos and Calvert County Government YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/CalvertCountyGov.

For updates on Parks & Recreation services, park availability, field closures and more visit Parks & Recreation at www.Facebook.com/CalvertCountyParks.

Find information on Calvert County Government services online at www.CalvertCountyMd.gov. Stay up to date with Calvert County Government on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CalvertCountyMd and YouTube at www.youtube.com/CalvertCountyGov.


Charles County Sheriff Troy Berry Establishes Youth Advisory Council

Charles County, MD…Charles County Sheriff Troy D. Berry, in partnership with Charles County Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Maria Navarro, recently met with members of a newly formed Youth Advisory Council established as part of Sheriff Berry’s initiatives to continue to build relationships with communities while enhancing trust among its members. “I felt it was critical to form a Council of students who could talk openly with me or any of our school resource officers about any questions or concerns they have with safety, security, and policing,” said Sheriff Berry. “Since being elected Sheriff, one of my top priorities was to establish a strong connection with our youth and I have continued to keep that promise year after year, despite the pandemic. Whether we meet in person or via a virtual conference call, I want students to understand that they have a voice with us and we want to hear them,” said Sheriff Berry. Dr. Navarro fully supported the idea and joined in on the meeting as a way to hear directly from students. "The Council not only provides Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) students with opportunities for community engagement, but also the ability to take active roles in sharing feedback, concerns and questions from among their peer groups," Navarro said.  

 

The Council, comprised of members of the Charles County Public Schools’ Student Government Associations (SGA) and other interested youth, was coordinated by Lt. Ken Klezia, commander of the Sheriff’s Office School Resource Section, and Mr. Gary Winsett, a teacher at Thomas Stone High School and SGA supervisor. While the first meeting was held at Thomas Stone High School, the meetings will be rotated to all high schools in the county and the group will meet once a month. Participants do not need to belong to any organizations; however, they must have an interest in solving problems with sustainable resolutions. “We are dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of the people we serve. We are committed to enhancing our relationships with our communities and we look forward to having meaningful discussions with students,” said Sheriff Berry.     

 

The Charles County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) was accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA) in 2001 and has since earned the highest rating of Excellence. Established in 1658, the CCSO is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the United States. For more information, visit www.ccso.us.

 

Charles County Crime Solvers offers rewards of up to $1,000 for information that leads to the arrest or indictment of a person responsible for a crime in Charles County. All individuals who provide tips through Crime Solvers will remain anonymous. Anyone with information about an unsolved crime or the location of a fugitive may contact Charles County Crime Solvers by calling 1-866-411-TIPS. Tips can also be submitted online at www.charlescountycrimesolvers.com or by using the P3Intel mobile app, which can be found in the Android Store and Apple store by searching P3tips. For more information about the P3 program, click on this link: www.p3intel.com. 


USDA Launches Pilot Program to Deploy Renewable Energy Infrastructure to People in Rural Towns

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 19, 2022 – U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that the Department is making up to $10 million available to help people living in rural towns develop community renewable energy projects that will help them cut their energy costs and contribute to the nationwide effort to reduce pollution that contributes to climate change. These funds will be targeted to help people who live in communities that have been historically underinvested and disinvested.

 

USDA is making the funds available through the new Rural Energy Pilot Program to help the people of rural America build back better, stronger and more equitably than ever before. Through this program, USDA is supporting the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to making environmental justice a part of every agency’s mission to address the disproportionate health, environmental, economic and climate impacts on disadvantaged communities.

 

“Under the leadership of President Biden and Vice President Harris, USDA is providing grant assistance for people who live in particularly underserved rural towns to help them cut their household energy costs and address climate change at the local level,” Vilsack said. “As we continue to rebuild the nation’s infrastructure, USDA is targeting resources and investments to help meet our nation’s energy needs and combat climate change. The new program we’re announcing today will pilot the viability of community-scale renewable energy investments to mitigate the energy-burdened circumstances of particularly disadvantaged rural communities. This assistance will help to keep people in their hometowns by supporting good-paying jobs, business opportunities, and a more affordable cost of living.”

 

Background:

 

USDA will make up to $10 million in grants available to particularly underserved rural communities. The funds can be used to deploy community-scale renewable energy technologies and innovations to reduce climate pollution and increase resilience to the impacts of climate change. These technologies include solar, wind, geothermal, micro-hydroelectric and biomass/bioenergy. Up to 20% of awarded funds may also be used for community energy planning, capacity building, technical assistance, energy efficiency and weatherization.

 

USDA is offering priority points to projects that advance key priorities under the Biden-Harris Administration to help communities recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, advance equity and combat climate change. These extra points will increase the likelihood of funding for projects seeking to address these critical challenges in rural America.

 

Details on an upcoming informational webinar is forthcoming and will be posted to the Rural Energy Pilot Program webpage.

 

Prospective applicants must inform the Agency by submitting a required Letter of Intent prior to submission of a complete application. The letters must be submitted via electronic upload into a secure cloud vault, by 11:59 p.m. EST on April 19, 2022.

 

Application guides and submission information are available on the program website, under the To Apply tab, www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/energy-programs/rural-energy-pilot-program.

 

For additional information, see page 2747 of the Jan. 19 Federal Register (PDF, 278 KB).

 

Under the Biden-Harris Administration, Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities, create jobs and improve the quality of life for millions of Americans in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural, tribal and high-poverty areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov. If you’d like to subscribe to USDA Rural Development updates, visit our GovDelivery subscriber page.

 

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate-smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.


Commissioners Do Not Reinstate Mask Requirement in Charles County

On Tuesday, Jan. 18, the Board of Commissioners held a Public Hearing on Required Face Coverings to receive feedback on reinstituting the mask mandate in Charles County. Following the public hearing on the emergency legislation, they voted 2-3 against Resolution 2021-21, which if passed would have required individuals to wear face coverings inside all indoor public spaces in Charles County. A supermajority vote (4-1 or 5-0) was required to have emergency legislation enacted.

County Attorney Wes Adams provided an overview of the proposed resolution. Charles County's Health Officer Dr. Dianna E. Abney shared data and other relevant information regarding current COVID-19 statistics, including vaccination rates, case rates, hospitalizations, and deaths. Prior to the public hearing, County Commissioners held a virtual briefing with Dr. Maria Navarro, Charles County Public Schools Superintendent, and members of the Charles County Board of Education to provide an update on the status of COVID-19 in public schools.

Residents can watch the public hearing on Roku and Apple TV streaming devices by searching “Charles County Government” on Comcast 95 (SD), Verizon FIOS 10, or clicking here


Governor Announces Extension Of Open Enrollment Through Maryland Health Connection After A Record Season

ANNAPOLIS, MD—Governor Larry Hogan today announced that open enrollment will continue on Maryland Health Connection through February in light of the ongoing public health emergency. A record number of Marylanders—181,603—have enrolled in coverage for 2022 through the state’s health insurance marketplace. A surge of new enrollees fueled the 9% increase over a year ago.

“As we battle this COVID-19 surge, this extended enrollment period will help get more Marylanders covered at a critical time,” said Governor Hogan. “One of the many lessons of the pandemic is how important it is to have access to affordable and reliable health coverage, and we are fortunate to have a health exchange that is a national model.”

Open enrollment, which began Nov. 1 and was originally scheduled to end Jan. 15, will now continue through Feb. 28. Anyone who enrolls by Jan. 31 will have coverage beginning Feb. 1. Those who enroll during February will be covered starting March 1.

New enrollees totaled 39,181—up 48%—between Nov. 1 and Jan. 15. Nearly 142,000 existing enrollees also retained their coverage—up 2%—as the health emergency stretched into a third year. Marylanders can also obtain dental insurance through the state marketplace. Those enrollments grew 29% from 51,505 a year ago to 66,634 for 2022.

Populations that have historically proportionately lacked health coverage, including young adults as well as Black and Hispanic residents, enrolled at record numbers during the enrollment period between Nov. 1 and Jan. 15.

Enrollment of adults ages 18 to 34 reached 49,576, a 6% increase over the 2021 open enrollment period. The gain was propelled by additional financial help from a $20 million fund that Maryland set aside during last year’s legislative session to encourage more young adults to get coverage, both for their own health and to help bring down the overall cost of coverage. Nearly two-thirds—32,122—of young adult enrollees qualified for the additional subsidy, which reduced their monthly costs about $35 per person. More than 8,000 of those young adults who qualified for the additional help were new enrollees.

Black enrollees for 2022 totaled 30,535, a 10% increase over the past year. Hispanic enrollees totaled 20,241, a 13% increase over the past year. Self-identification of race and ethnicity is optional on the application.

“I’m pleased that the marketing and outreach efforts we targeted to those groups helped get the message out about the need for health insurance, especially now,” said Michele Eberle, executive director of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange, which runs the state’s health insurance marketplace. “Getting high-quality, affordable coverage to as many uninsured people as possible and responding to chronic health inequities are essential to our mission. I’d like to thank our amazing statewide partners for helping us spread the word.”

Other action in recent years by state and federal officials helped fuel enrollments. The reinsurance program that Governor Hogan and the Maryland General Assembly created in 2018 with federal approval led Maryland to offer some of the most affordable plans in the nation. On average, Maryland’s individual market offered the least expensive gold and bronze plans and the third least expensive silver plans in the nation, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis in October.

Also, the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, approved by Congress and signed by President Biden last March, broadened financial help to all income levels for people who buy their own health coverage. That was reflected in the enrollment totals: The number of people who earn more than four times the federal poverty level, which was the cap for financial help before the rescue plan, grew by 60% over a year ago to 16,053. The federal poverty level is $12,880 for an individual and $26,500 for a family of four.

Additional enrollment opportunities will continue this year, including the Easy Enrollment Program, which allows uninsured people to get coverage if they check a box when filing their state income tax form.

A similar program will launch later this year for any Marylander filing for Unemployment Insurance who checks a box to indicate that they need coverage.

Maryland’s approach has helped stabilize prices and enrollment on the individual health insurance market. Coverage is open to all applicants regardless of pre-existing conditions since the Affordable Care Act launched a decade ago.

The total number of Marylanders who purchase their own health insurance grew 5% from 234,802 a year ago to 245,538 this month. That total includes both those who buy through Maryland Health Connection, the only outlet for financial help, and those who buy directly through one of the three companies that serve the individual market in Maryland.


Notice Of Public Hearing

LEONARDTOWN, MD - NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commissioners of St. Mary’s County will hold a Public Hearing Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, at 6:30 p.m. in the Chesapeake Building located at 41770 Baldridge Street in Leonardtown, to consider public input on a proposed ordinance to amend St. Mary’s County Comprehensive Land Use Map and the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance for property located at 29871 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall. The request is to change the Land Use Map category from Residential Mixed-use and Mixed-use Moderate Intensity to entirely Mixed-use Moderate Intensity and Zoning Map from Residential Mixed-use and Town Center Mixed-use to entirely Town Center Mixed-use for the split zoned property located at 29871 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall.

The proposed ordinance can be viewed at  http://www.stmarysmd.com/publichearings.asp.

Those wishing to address the Commissioners may participate in-person or via teleconferencing, email, written correspondence or prerecorded video submissions. The public hearing may be viewed on SMCG Channel 95 or the SMCG YouTube Channel.

 

In lieu of appearance, comments may be submitted via:

a. Call: 301-475-4200, ext. 1234 to speak via telephone during the Public Hearing.

b. Email: csmc@stmarysmd.com

c. U.S. Mail: P.O. Box 653 Leonardtown, MD, 20650

d. Submit a three-minute video clip to publicmtgs@stmarysmd.com no later than 5 p.m., Feb. 8, 2022.

 

Citizens may listen to the Public Hearing by calling 301-579-7236; Access code: 963443#.

All submissions will be considered by the Commissioners at the Public Hearing and/or seven (7) days following the Public Hearing. Public Hearing Guidelines are subject to change.

Appropriate accommodations for individuals with special needs will be provided upon request. In order to meet these requirements, we respectfully ask for one week’s prior notice. Please contact the County Commissioners Office at 301-475-4200, Ext. 1340. Proceedings are televised live and/or recorded for later broadcast on television. All content of these proceedings is subject to disclosure under the Maryland Public Information Act. Photographic and electronic audio and visual broadcasting and recording devices are used during the Commissioners’ meetings. These are public meetings and attendance at these meetings automatically grants St. Mary’s County Government permission to broadcast your audio and visual image.

 


Fourteen Businesses Pass Alcohol Compliance Checks

Jan. 18, 2022:

 

On Friday afternoon, Jan. 14, 2022, the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office Alcohol Enforcement Unit conducted a series of covert compliance checks at local businesses, using an underage individual. The underage individual entered the businesses without identification and attempted to purchase alcoholic beverages.

 

During this covert compliance check operation, the Alcohol Enforcement Unit visited 16 businesses in St. Mary’s County. Fourteen of the stores were compliant, requiring identification from the underage individual and did not complete the sale. Two of the businesses were negligent in their responsibilities, did not ask for identification and sold alcoholic beverages to the underage person.

 

The non-compliant businesses and clerks who sold the alcoholic beverages to the underage person will receive summons to appear before the St. Mary’s County Alcohol Board for possible sanctions.

 

The 14 compliant businesses were: Abell’s Tavern in Callaway; Beacon Liquors in Callaway; Canopy Liquors in Lexington Park; St. Mary’s Fine Wine & Spirits in Great Mills; Stop & Shop in Lexington Park; County Liquors in Lexington Park; International Beverage in Lexington Park; Bob’s Sunoco in Callaway; Wildewood Fine Wine and Spirits in California; Marketplace Wine & Spirits in California; California Wine & Spirits in California; Jughead Liquors in California; ABC Liquors in California and 2000 Liquors in Lexington Park.

 

The two non-compliant businesses were Cook’s Liquors & Deli in Park Hall and PAX Fine Wine & Spirits in California.

 

For official news and information, follow the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office on Twitter @firstsheriff.


Notice Of Public Hearing

LEONARDTOWN, MD - NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commissioners of St. Mary’s County will hold a Public Hearing Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, at 9:30 a.m. in the Chesapeake Building located at 41770 Baldridge Street in Leonardtown, to consider public input on a proposed ordinance to amend St. Mary’s County Comprehensive Land Use Map and the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance for property located at 23595 Pike Lane and 23556 Three Notch Road. The request is  to change the Land Use Map category from Rural Preservation to Residential Mixed-use and Zoning Map from Rural Preservation to Residential Mixed-use for the properties located at

The proposed ordinance can be viewed at  http://www.stmarysmd.com/publichearings.asp.

Those wishing to address the Commissioners may participate in-person or via teleconferencing, email, written correspondence or prerecorded video submissions. The public hearing may be viewed on SMCG Channel 95 or the SMCG YouTube Channel.

 

In lieu of appearance, comments may be submitted via:

a. Call: 301-475-4200, ext. 1234 to speak via telephone during the Public Hearing.

b. Email: csmc@stmarysmd.com

c. U.S. Mail: P.O. Box 653 Leonardtown, MD, 20650

d. Submit a three-minute video clip to publicmtgs@stmarysmd.com no later than 5 p.m., Feb. 8, 2022.

 

Citizens may listen to the Public Hearing by calling 301-579-7236; Access code: 963443#.

All submissions will be considered by the Commissioners at the Public Hearing and/or seven (7) days following the Public Hearing. Public Hearing Guidelines are subject to change.

Appropriate accommodations for individuals with special needs will be provided upon request. In order to meet these requirements, we respectfully ask for one week’s prior notice. Please contact the County Commissioners Office at 301-475-4200, Ext. 1340. Proceedings are televised live and/or recorded for later broadcast on television. All content of these proceedings is subject to disclosure under the Maryland Public Information Act. Photographic and electronic audio and visual broadcasting and recording devices are used during the Commissioners’ meetings. These are public meetings and attendance at these meetings automatically grants St. Mary’s County Government permission to broadcast your audio and visual image.


La Plata Man Charged After Setting His Truck On Fire

A La Plata man is facing arson charges after Deputy State Fire Marshals concluded he was responsible for setting his truck on fire yesterday morning.

Shortly after 10 a.m., investigators assigned to the Southern Regional Office were requested to assist Charles County Sheriff's Office after believing Leroy G. Lyle, 67, had intentionally set his 2003 Dodge Dakota on fire. During the investigation, Deputy State Fire Marshals confirmed that Lyles of the 8900 block of Hawthorne Road was responsible for the fire and charged with 2nd Degree Arson.

With the assistance of the Charles County Sheriff's Office, he was transported to Charles County Detention Center, where he is currently being held without bond.


Patrol Officers Arrest Suspect in Burglary Case and Recover Stolen Property

Patrol Officers Arrest Suspect in Burglary Case / Stolen Property Recovered: On January 13 at 2:15 a.m., officers initiated a traffic stop in the 3700 block of Crain Highway for speeding. Upon approaching the vehicle, officers noticed a new mini-bike in the back. Through further investigation, officers were able to confirm the mini-bike had just been stolen from a nearby business during a burglary. The suspect, Brandon Cather, 32, of Mechanicsville, was arrested and charged with burglary, theft, and traffic-related offenses. On January 14, a judge ordered Cather could be released on personal recognizance as long as he obtains electronic monitoring. Anyone with additional information is asked to call Officer Bigelow at 301-932-2222. 

The Charles County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) was accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA) in 2001 and has since earned the highest rating of Excellence. Established in 1658, the CCSO is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the United States. For more information, visit www.ccso.us.

 

Charles County Crime Solvers offers rewards of up to $1,000 for information that leads to the arrest or indictment of a person responsible for a crime in Charles County. All individuals who provide tips through Crime Solvers will remain anonymous. Anyone with information about an unsolved crime or the location of a fugitive may contact Charles County Crime Solvers by calling 1-866-411-TIPS. Tips can also be submitted online at www.charlescountycrimesolvers.com or by using the P3Intel mobile app, which can be found in the Android Store and Apple store by searching P3tips. For more information about the P3 program, click on this link: www.p3intel.com. 


Governor Hogan Announces Enhanced Benefits for Utility and Electric Assistance to Address Rise in Heating Costs

 Governor Larry Hogan today announced that, to address the rise in heating costs, recipients of the state’s utility and electric assistance will receive enhanced benefits during this home heating season. The state is also increasing funding for weatherization assistance programs to improve energy conservation.

“The relief we are announcing today will help our most vulnerable residents keep up with higher energy costs and stay warm throughout the winter months,” said Governor Hogan. “This is all part of our commitment to devote some of our record budget surplus to helping Marylanders in need.”

This assistance will be administered by the Maryland Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD).

Enhanced Benefits for Utility and Electric Assistance. The State of Maryland is enhancing the minimum benefit for electric and heating assistance eligible recipients to further support vulnerable populations.

  • Through the Maryland Energy Assistance Program (MEAP), recipients will see their minimum benefit increase by 66%, from $300 to $500. Overall, MEAP is receiving a 30% increase in funding to support this enhanced benefit.
  • Through the Electric Universal Assistance Program (EUSP), recipients will see their minimum benefit double from $150 to $300. Overall, EUSP is receiving a 32% increase in funding to support this enhanced benefit.

“Every year, more than 100,000 Maryland households who feel squeezed by high energy costs benefit from our energy assistance programs,” said Secretary Lourdes R. Padilla of DHS. “The actions taken by Governor Hogan provide help for struggling Marylanders dealing with higher heating and energy bills.”

Weatherization Assistance. The state will provide $29 million in weatherization assistance program funding across the next two years—a 190% increase—to further help households across Maryland install energy conservation materials. These measures both reduce the consumption of energy and the cost of maintenance for these homes.

Supplemental Energy Bill Assistance. Based on the projected increase in heating and cooling costs by the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Winter Fuel Outlook, $30 million in supplemental bill assistance will be issued to utilities on behalf of customers and applied over a six-month billing period. Low income households in Maryland should expect to receive approximately $83 per month in bill assistance over six month periods in FY 2022 and FY 2023 respectively.

Expanded Energy Assistance Outreach. Outreach funding of $5 million will be administered by DHS to its community based organizations, which assist vulnerable populations in each of Maryland’s 24 jurisdictions with completing applications, submitting any necessary follow up documentation, and answering questions about energy assistance programs.

Residents in need of energy assistance may apply online, mail in an application, or apply in person at a local Home Energy Program Office located in each of Maryland’s 24 jurisdictions. Detailed information on how to apply can be found on the DHS website.

Visit the DHS and DHCD websites for additional program details, including eligibility information, contact information, and answers to frequently asked questions.


BusPatrol School Bus Safety Program to go into Full Effect

Charles County, MD… Beginning on January 18, the BusPatrol school bus safety program in Charles County will go into full effect–meaning motorists who violate bus-stopping laws, as captured on buses outfitted with cameras, will receive an actual citation in the mail rather than a letter of warning. The Charles County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) and Charles County Public Schools (CCPS), in partnership with a safety technology company, BusPatrol, launched the program in November 2021 and provided a 60-day warning period in which violators received a letter in the mail alerting them of the violation and making them aware of the laws. The program placed 375 cameras on school buses to deter drivers from illegally passing stopped school buses that have their red lights activated. From November 18, 2021 – to December 31, 2021, the number of violations detected by BusPatrol cameras was 1,120. Evaluating the data from the grace period revealed the three leading areas of violations are:  

  • 5100 block of Leonardtown Road near Forest Park in Waldorf
  • 2800 block of Crain Highway in Waldorf
  • 6300 block of Crain Highway in La Plata

 

In the Leonardtown Road area, the roadway has multiple travel lanes on either side and is not divided into two or more roadways by an intervening space such as a barrier, median, or a clearly indicated dividing section constructed to impede vehicular traffic. On these types of roadways, drivers on either side must stop for a school bus with flashing red lights, no matter what direction they are traveling. State highway signs forewarning drivers of the law are erected on either side of the roadway (see attached photos). Click on this link for an example of the violations on Leonardtown Road: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZFcsGXoN8oL_L-nVnos4sAltvCyae2bt/view?usp=sharing

 

Crain Highway is considered a divided highway throughout the entire county and as such has a barrier and median; therefore, drivers traveling on the opposite side of the roadway of a stopped school bus do not have to stop.  

“These numbers clearly show drivers must do better when traveling on roadways with school buses,” said Sheriff Troy D. Berry. According to BusPatrol, the numbers of violations are comparable to other jurisdictions and serve as a stark reminder of the importance of being aware of the laws and knowing when to stop. “Keeping our school children safe, especially as they enter or exit the bus is a priority. It is the law for motorists to stop for school buses when the flashing red lights are on. Sadly, we have encountered drivers who are not following the law or who are not paying attention. Either way, this program will raise awareness of the requirements of the law when it comes to school bus stops and ultimately improve the safety of students,” said Sheriff Berry.

 

Much like the automated red-light camera program and automated speed enforcement cameras in school zones, all automated violations in Charles County are certified by a sworn employee with the Charles County Sheriff’s Office and issued through the BusPatrol program. The county civil citation from violations verified through the bus camera program will be $250 to the registered owner(s) of the vehicle but does not assess points. 

Maryland law requires a driver of a motor vehicle to stop for a school vehicle (school bus) that is stopped and operating flashing red lights and remain stopped until the school vehicle resumes motion or deactivates the flashing lights. If a driver violates this law in the presence of a police officer and it is cited by a police officer, the penalty is a $570 fine and 3 points.

 

The Charles County Sheriff’s Office is committed to the safety and well-being of schoolchildren who travel on our roadways in buses. These programs are working to improve school bus safety through education and enforcement.

 

To see another actual violation in Charles County, click on this link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1pXsX9nuQqG_JP1bgokxEe6yM1PfNg30K/view?usp=sharing

 

The Charles County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) was accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA) in 2001 and has since earned the highest rating of Excellence. Established in 1658, the CCSO is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the United States. For more information, visit www.ccso.us.

Charles County Crime Solvers offers rewards of up to $1,000 for information that leads to the arrest or indictment of a person responsible for a crime in Charles County. All individuals who provide tips through Crime Solvers will remain anonymous. Anyone with information about an unsolved crime or the location of a fugitive may contact Charles County Crime Solvers by calling 1-866-411-TIPS. Tips can also be submitted online at www.charlescountycrimesolvers.com or by using the P3Intel mobile app, which can be found in the Android Store and Apple store by searching P3tips. For more information about the P3 program, click on this link: www.p3intel.com. 


Calendar

January

S M T W T F S
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          

Weather

Visitor Polls

Should Kids Physically Be In School This Fall
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)

Your email address is never published.

On Air Now

Regular Programming
8:00am - 4:00pm
Regular Programming